Fun  - Aphrodisiac

Fun - Aphrodisiac

Barrenwort
The roots of this aphrodisiac trace back to China, Japan and Korea. It’s used to help nourish the kidneys, strengthen arteries and reduce blood pressure. For postmenopausal women, it helps boost estrogen. For men, it helps with impotence, erectile dysfunction and spermatorrhea. Another name for Barrenwort is horny goat weed. Need I say more?
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Of course, none of these aphrodisiacs are meant to replace treatments for serious medical conditions, like erectile dysfunction. And for some people, a trip to a doctor for medications may be needed and can be extremely helpful. But if you’re planning a romantic evening and want to do some safe exploration with your partner, give it a try.

Caterpillar fungus
This Tibetan fungus only grows during the spring, but it’s not its harvest schedule that makes it so desirable. Also known as “yartsa gunbu” and “the Viagra of the Himalayas,” this fungus is worth $50,000 a pound. A Tibetan text from the 1400s describes the fungus as being most helpful in the bedroom, increasing one’s sex drive and overall virility. Today, people all over China still buy the caterpillar fungus, not just for its sexual qualities but as a status symbol.

If Irish society were examined through its film, literary and media cultures, apart altogether from religious and legislative mores, a casual observer could only conclude that sex and sexuality Irish-style occupy a narrow range from the cringingly awkward to the downright dysfunctional.

This weekend's bravura outpouring of sometimes amusing reports wondering whether the anti-impotence treatment Viagra will become the recreational drug of the late 1990s pulses tacitly with the entirely unfunny assertion that pharmacological answers can solve the grittiest aspects of social and cultural ineptitude. That is not just glib, but in a country where drink and sex have a long and tortuous relationship, quite traditionally naive.

Fun  - Aphrodisiac: A Tibetan text from the 1400s describes the fungus as being most helpful in the bedroom, increasing one’s sex drive and overall virility.  That is not just glib, but in a country where drink and sex have a long and tortuous relationship, quite traditionally naive. f Irish society were examined through its film, literary and media cultures, apart altogether from religious and legislative mores, a casual observer could only conclude that sex and sexuality Irish-style occupy a narrow range from the cringingly awkward to the downright dysfunctional.


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