Scream - Aphrodisiac

Scream - Aphrodisiac

In both Britain and Germany health ministers have enabled Viagra to maintain its marketing mystique by refusing to allow its prescription through their respective general medical services. Had they wished to perpetuate the mistaken belief that Viagra is an aphrodisiac, they could hardly have picked a more certain strategy.

The questions in Ireland are only beginning, and already the debate is losing its focus on the 180,000 men who suffer impotence at some point in their lives, and live with all the psychic and social losses that entails. Yet the most remarkable feature in the debate so far is not the reported maximum potential cost of £20 million to the GMS if Viagra prescriptions are admitted to its scheme, but the news, presented as a virtual arithmetic footnote, that 162,000 men who are impotent are not expected to consult their doctors about the condition. On the evidence so far, they will not be encouraged to do so.

A man and woman had been married for fifteen years and their sex life was starting to die so they went to a doctor, who prescribed an aphrodisiac. He gave the bottle to the wife, telling her to put them in her husband's drink every evening and that their sex life should improve.

But how sexually arousing are the hairy bivalves for the rest of us? And more to the point, is there any scientific evidence that they work?

Scream - Aphrodisiac: A man and woman had been married for fifteen years and their sex life was starting to die so they went to a doctor, who prescribed an aphrodisiac.


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